GAUK Motors Property
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1908 Triumph 08 Roadster

At the first Isle of Man Tourist Trophy race in 1907, Jack Marshall and Frank Hulbert, both riding Triumphs, finished 2nd and 3rd respectively in the single cylinder class. After such success, a special TT Model was produced which went on to win the 1908 class and set a lap record (at a blistering 42.8 MPH). This bike was possibly the world’s first purpose built racer and was not released for general sale.

This marked the first victory by a machine built entirely, both frame and engine, by the same marque. Triumph’s reputation for endurance and speed was established by this fine single cylinder machine. The 475cc motor offered a number of uncommon and successful features – ball bearing supported crank shaft (an industrial first), both valves were mechanically operated, and the cams were machined into the inner radi of the timing gears.

In 1908 Triumph also produced its own carburettor, making it one of only a handful of companies to have done so. This lovely restoration therefore represents a very significant development for Triumph, both in technical terms and also in appreciating that winning races sells bikes, even as far back as in 1908.

This bike became part of the NZ Classic Motorcycles collection in 2009.